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Posts Tagged ‘e-journals’

How to access Marketing Review (or Business Strategy Review or …)

1 September 2013 1 comment

Rather than another How to access Harvard Business Review post this year we take an example from Marketing Review.

Gabbott, M. (2004). “Undertaking a Literature Review in Marketing”. Marketing Review, 4(4), pp. 411-429.

Now to read the full-text – University of Manchester students and staff do not have to pay but you do have to access Marketing Review via a journals database.

Keep title, author, year and issue (i.e. the main bibliographic details) to hand, and follow these steps:

1. Goto the e-journals A-to-Z list.

The e-journals A-to-Z list link is on business and management journal articles page.

If you are accessing from a mobile device you can use the  EBSCOhost app.

Marketing Review on e-journals A-Z list (click to expand)

Marketing Review on e-journals A-Z list (click to expand)

2. Find details of UoM subscription to the Marketing Review journal

Search for all journals with the words “marketing review ” in their title (I used “starts with” rather than “contains” to limit the results).

The result indicates that the University subscribes to Marketing Review through the journal database EBSCOhost Business Source Premier.

Note the access information, especially if you are off-campus.

Click on the link. This takes you to the FindIT@UML for Marketing Review – click GO.

3. Authenticate your access to Business Source Premier

This step will vary depending on whether you are on-campus or on-campus.

On-campus, your PC is recognised as belonging to the University and no additional authentication is required.

If you are off-campus you need to login using your University username and password.

If you are off-campus and using the VPN software then you are “virtually on-campus” – your PC behaves as an on-campus PC.

Marketing Review all issues (click to expand)

Marketing Review all issues (click to expand)

4. Select the Marketing Review issue

When you get to the Marketing Review page on Business Source Premier (EBSCO host):

Expand the year (from the article’s bibliographic details) and then select the relevant issue.

Or

Use the search within this publication link.

Marketing Review article (click to review)

Marketing Review article (click to review)

5. Get the article

When you get to the page for a Marketing Review issue:

Scroll through the articles to find the one that you want

Or

Amend the search at the top of the page with further details e.g. author surname, title keywords …

You can download the full-text by selecting the PDF full text link.

Use the add to folder link and then the folder view and export to add the bibliographic details to your reference management system.

Other papers available through the journal database EBSCOhost Business Source Premier.

Vermeulen, F (2011), “Voices: Five mistaken beliefs business leaders have about innovation”, Business Strategy Review, 22(4), pp. 77-78.

Zenger, J, Folkman, J, and Edinger, S (2011), “Making Yourself Indispensable”, Harvard Business Review, 89(10), pp. 84-92.

Finally

For articles from other journals the stages are the same but the details will vary depending on the journal database. For more information look at our research guides or FAQ answers on e-journals.

Google scholar – Find It via UML

2 October 2012 1 comment

Google scholar is a useful resource for finding books and articles. On campus PCs are configured so that it provides Find It via UML links. Off campus you can configure Google scholar to include these links.

Google Scholar – Find It via UML (click to enlarge)

Configuring Google Scholar

  1. Select the Scholar Settings link at the top right of http://scholar.google.co.uk/
  2. In the Library Links section, find the University of Manchester library
  3. Click the Save Preferences button at the foot of the page.

Video demo of setting Google Scholar preferences – http://screencast.com/t/c3SJISwTVwp

Note:

The Find It via UML links do not give you direct access to online articles. You still need to authenticate yourself as a member of the University to access the full text.

How can I check a journal’s availability through the library?

Other e-journal related questions on the FAQ

For those interested in the details, adding the library preference to Google scholar means that it checks the library’s “link resolver” for items in the search results and adds a link where appropriate.

Finding Journal Article from reference

14 September 2012 Leave a comment

Often it is easy to find the full-text of a journal article from a reference, but sometimes you have to check carefully. Here is a recent example from a PhD student in the Marketing, Operations Management and Service Systems division.

Sandelowski, M., (1995) “Sample size in qualitative research”, Research in Nursing and Health, 18(2), pp. 179-183.

Step 1 – Check library subscription to the journal (electronic version)

Research in Nursing and Health availability (click to expand)

Use the Electronic Journals A-Z List to find details of the library’s subscription to Research in Nursing and Health.

Note that it is possible for the library to have online access to a journal through different databases. If this is the case then the databases may not all cover the same years, so check the year for your specific article.

In this case the journal Research in Nursing and Health is only available from one database, but our subscription only covers articles from 1996.
(This explains why even when you access Wiley Online Library as a member of the University of Manchester you still get asked to pay if you try to access the PDF of the Sandelowski article.)

Step 2 – Check the library journal holdings

If the full-text of the article is not available online then you can check if the the library holds a physical copy of the journal.

Search the University of Manchester Library catalogue for the journal name Research in Nursing and Health, and filter “Collection – Journals”. If the library does hold a physical copy then you expand the entry to obtain the location details.

In this case we do have Research in Nursing and Health Volume 18 (1995) in the Main Library Clinical Sciences Periodicals (Green 1).

Step 3 – Decide on Document Supply (Inter-Library Loan)

If you decide that the article is essential then you can request the article through the Document Supply and Inter-Library Loan service. (This will usually only take 2-3 working days if the British Library holds an electronic copy of the journal article.)

If the article was interesting but not essential you might want to look for other articles by the same author(s), or use cited reference searching to find more recent articles on the same theme.

FAQ answer How can I check a journal’s availability through the library? now updated with link to new Electronic Journals A to Z list.

How to access Harvard Business Review

30 August 2012 3 comments

The Electronic Journals A to Z list is now accessed through Library Search – selecting the eJournals A-Z tab and searching for “harvard business review” gives access through EBSCOhost Business Source Premier. (University of Manchester username and password) [Update October 2014]

The University of Manchester Library has changed its Electronic Journals A to Z list so this is a revised version of “How to access Harvard Business Review” – an essential skill for all. (Link removed – eJournals A-Z is now in Library Search and is slightly different from the image below.)

You find an interesting Harvard Business Review (HBR) article on the web and want to read the full-text.

HBR website - article

You have found your article – keep title, author, year and issue (i.e. the bibliographic details) to hand.

University of Manchester students and staff do not have to pay but you do have to access HBR via a journals database.

If you are accessing from a mobile device you can use the   EBSCOhost app.

Using a browser, follow these steps:

1. Goto the e-journals A-to-Z list.

(For example goto www.mbs.ac.uk/library  select e-Resources – Electronic Journals and then A-Z Electronic Journals)

HBR on e-journals A to Z list (click to expand)

2. Find details of UoM subscription to the HBR journal

Search for all journals with the words “harvard business review ” in their title.

The result indicates that the University subscribes to HBR through the journal database EBSCOhost Business Source Premier.

Note the access information, especially if you are off-campus.

Click on the link. This takes you to the FindIT@UML for HBR – click GO.

EBSCO login page for HBR

login page off-campus (click to expand)

3. Authenticate your access to Business Source Premier

This step will vary depending on whether you are on-campus or on-campus.

On-campus, your PC is recognised as belonging to the University and no additional authentication is required.

If you are off-campus you need to login using your University username and password. [Updated instruction added 1 Sept 2013]

[Original now out of date] If you are off-campus you need to select the Shibboleth login link and provide your details (for more detail see previous access Harvard Business Review post).

If you are off-campus and using the VPN software then you are “virtually on-campus” – your PC behaves as an on-campus PC.

HBR All issues

HBR all issues (click to expand)

4. Select the HBR issue

When you get to the HBR page on Business Source Premier (EBSCO host):

Expand the year (from the article’s bibliographic details) and then select the relevant issue.

Or

Use the search within this publication link.

HBR article

HBR article (click to expand)

5. Get the article

When you get to the page for a HBR issue:

Scroll through the articles to find the one that you want

Or

Amend the search at the top of the page with further details e.g. author surname, title keywords …

You can download the full-text by selecting the PDF full text link.

Use the add to folder link and then the folder view and export to add the bibliographic details to your reference management system.

Finally

For articles from other journals the stages are the same but the details will vary depending on the journal database. For more information look at our research guides or FAQ answers on e-journals.

Cited Reference Searching

10 July 2012 1 comment

In researching a topic it is often very useful to find articles that have cited an article of particular interest. There are two library databases with good support for this cited reference searching: Web of Knowledge (aka Web of Science) and Scopus. Taking an example:

Mouzas, S., Henneberg, S., and Naude, P. (2007) Trust and reliance in business relationships. European Journal of Marketing, 41 (9-10), 1016-1032.

Web of Science/Knowledge - reference searching

Web of Knowledge – (click to expand)

Web of Knowledge  (Web of Science) shows that this article has been cited by 12 articles that are themselves covered by Web of Science.

It also offers the chance to look for related articles – those that are similar to this one because of the references they share.

These features can be used to trace the development of research ideas through shared references and reference chains: paperA cited_by paperB cited_by paperC cited_by …

Note: Web of Knowledge  does not give direct access to full-text but these are mostly easily reachable through the purple FindIt@UML links.

Scopus (click to expand)

Scopus shows that this article has been cited by 17 articles that are covered by Scopus. The details are in the Cited by since 1996 section on the right hand side.

Scopus will often provide a greater number of cited-by articles  since it  covers a greater range of business and managenent journals. See  Journal database comparison

Like Web of Knowledge, Scopus also offers links to related documents based on the references they share and access to full text through  the purple FindIt@UML links. Both databases  also offer the chance to setup an alert when a particular article is cited by another in the database.

Google scholar will give an even greater number of cited by resources – 39 for this example. This is because Google scholar will include everything where it can find the full text or bibliometric information on the web – articles, books, conference papers, working papers, reports, theses. In contrast Web of Knowledge  and Scopus only include cited by from respected academic publications that qualify for inclusion in the respective database.

Finally I must acknowledge Dave Hirst’s post on the Everything Engineering blog that partly inspired this one – How to track the citations? Web of Science versus Google Scholar.

Electronic Journals A-Z list

14 September 2011 1 comment

A-Z list of electronic journals – click to expand

The library’s Electronic Journals A-Z list allows you to check which journals are available online in full-text.

There is a simple search: just enter keywords from the journal title, click on search and all matching journals are returned, in alphabetical order.

For example, if type china quarterly and search you get 5 matching journals which have both china and quarterly in their title. In this case you have to scroll down to the fourth entry for the journal titles China Quarterly.

The library purchases journals in packages from publishers so for some journals there may be more than one source.

A-Z list results China Quarterly – click to expand

If there are several sources: check the publication dates covered by the different sources.

In this China Quarterly example:

  • ABI Inform (Proquest) has from 2001 onwards, but not the most recent year
  • Cambridge University Press has from 2001 onwards (no embargo)
  • JSTOR has from 1960 to 2005

Alternative

You can also do a library catalogue search for china quarterly and restrict the results to Collection Journals.

Related help

Note: the Electronic Journals A-Z list has recently been updated so it has a new look, but the main functionality is unchanged.

Emerald: Helping you find the Right Journal article for your Research

1 September 2011 Leave a comment

Emerald provides access to over 1500 full-text peer reviewed academic and scholarly Journals. The database covers a wide range of subject areas including:

  • Finance
  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Marketing
  • Product Development
  • Enterprise and Innovation

How can Emerald help me?

Emerald contains academic/theoretical articles for a number of key business and management journals.

Use Emerald to:

  • Keep up to date with management developments/techniques/strategies
  • Analyse marketing techniques/strategies
  • Explore Company case examples and developments
  • Substantiate theoretical models or debate

How can I access Emerald?

Emerald can be accessed via the “E-Resources” section of the MBS Library web-site. http://www.mbs.ac.uk/library

Select “Resources” then “Management Literature”

How should I search Emerald?

  • Use “Quick Search” to search across all journals for a phrase or keyword
  • Use “Advanced Search” to build a more accurate search strategy
  • Use “Browse” to view details of subscribed journals either using A-Z or subject categories

Emerald is one of our key Business and Management Journal Databases available for you to access via the MBS Library page.

Resource guides outlining how to use Emerald as well as guides to all our other online resources are available from our “How to Research Guides” web-page.